Posts Tagged ‘prayer’

A Safe Place for Sad People

October 2, 2016

“May I be bold enough to say that a church that only knows how to pray for suffering to be removed and knows nothing of praying for it to be redeemed is not a safe church for sad people.”

Nancy Guthrie, 6 Ways to Make Your Church a Safe Place for Sad People, April 2011

Tune Our Hearts

July 1, 2012

“God of our life,
there are days when the burdens we carry chafe our shoulders and weigh us down,
when the road seems dreary and endless,
the skies gray and threatening,
when our lives have no music in them,
and our hearts are lonely,
and our souls have lost courage.
Flood the path with light,
turn our eyes to where the skies are full of promise,
tune our hearts to brave music,
give us the sense of comradeship with heroes and saints of every age,
and so quicken our spirits that we may be able to encourage the souls of all who journey with us on the road of life,
to your honor and glory, we pray.  Amen.”

-St. Augustine (354-430)

A Morning Prayer

July 25, 2009

“Lord God, almighty and everlasting Father, you have brought me in safety to this new day:  Preserve me with your mighty power, that I may not fall into sin, nor be overcome by adversity; and in all I do direct me to the fulfilling of your purpose; through Jesus Christ my Lord.  Amen.”

The Divine Hours, adapted from The Book of Common Prayer

To Glory in My Cross

July 10, 2009

“My dear God, I have never thanked You for my thorns.  I have thanked you a thousand times for my roses but not once for my thorns.  I have always looked forward to the place where I will be rewarded for my cross, but I have never thought of my cross as a present glory itself.

Teach me, O God, to glory in my cross.  Teach me the value of my thorns.  Show me how I have climbed to You through the path of pain.  Show me it is through my tears I have seen my rainbows.”

– George Matheson (1842-1906)

An Evening Prayer

July 1, 2009

“Lord Jesus, stay with me, for evening is at hand and the day is past; be my companion in the way, kindle my heart, and awaken hope, that I may know you as you are revealed in Scripture and in the breaking of bread.  Grant this for the sake of your love toward me.  Amen.”

The Divine Hours, adapted from The Book of Common Prayer

An Advent Prayer

November 30, 2008

“Lord, let not our souls be busy inns that have no room for thee or thine,
But quiet homes of prayer and praise, where thou mayest find fit company,
Where the needful cares of life are wisely ordered and put away,
And wide, sweet spaces kept for thee; where holy thoughts pass up and down
And fervent longings watch and wait thy coming.”

– Julian of Norwich (1340-1426)

No Longer My Own

January 6, 2008

This morning our priest read this beautiful prayer from the Methodist Covenant Service.

“I am no longer my own but yours.

Put me to what you will,

rank me with whom you will;

put me to doing, put me to suffering;

let me be employed for you or laid aside for you,

exalted for you or brought low for you;

let me be full, let me be empty,

let me have all things, let me have nothing;

I freely and wholeheartedly yield all things

to your pleasure and disposal.”

Praying for My Enemies

April 18, 2007

When I decided to undertake the spiritual exercise 10 People to Pray for to Start Changing the World, prepared by my friend John Lamoreau, I really didn’t think it would be all that difficult. After all, I think I’m a pretty nice person. And I don’t really have any “enemies.”

But John’s list was disturbingly practical – pray for the family member who bugs you the most, your most obnoxious co-worker, the most abrasive person in your church. And the guidelines said to not pray for these people to change in the way I want them to, but to pray for God to bless and guide them.

This exercise turned out to be more difficult than I thought. The list also included the politician you most dislike and the most evil person in the world who comes to mind. But it was actually harder to pray for the people in my own life that I struggle with than it was to pray for a nasty dictator! Some of the prayers were said through clenched teeth.
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